Clutter

Don’t hoard treasure down here where it gets eaten by moths and corroded by rust or—worse!—stolen by burglars. Stockpile treasure in heaven, where it’s safe from moth and rust and burglars. It’s obvious, isn’t it? The place where your treasure is, is the place you will most want to be, and end up being.
Matthew 6:19-21 (The Message)

As many of you know, my family and I have been in the process of getting out house ready to go on the market. Before anyone gets too nervous, we aren’t planning a move away from Marshfield. However, as our family has changed over the past few years and will continue to change over the next few years, we have found that we simply have too much house for our family. It is time to downsize. And, what better time to do some of that hard work than over Labor Day weekend.

To make a long story a bit shorter, with the help of some friends we found out that we had at least 30 cubic yards of stuff we didn’t really need anymore. Yes, that much. What looked like a huge construction dumpster quickly filled to capacity and there was quite a bonfire (that lasted for two whole days) of paperwork and wooden things. I knew there was a lot of “extra” stuff in our barn, and stashed in closets in our house. I just had no idea how much.

Jesus told the assembled crowd during the Sermon on the Mount that where we store our treasures is important. I certainly wouldn’t say that what went into that trash container, or onto the burn pile, was treasure. However, as I’ve reflected on it over the past few days, I’ve come to understand that all that stuff did represent things that can keep us away from being the best version of ourselves. In other words, I had to clear up the clutter in my house to make way for our dream of building a home for ourselves.

But clearing up the physical clutter didn’t just make more room in our house, or in the barn. The amazing thing was how cleaning out that stuff has opened the space for more creativity in other parts of my life. I’m thinking more clearly. And that’s not all, I’ve been more “in tune” with God over the past couple of days as well. It really is astounding how a little bit (or a lot) of physical cleaning can clear out the clutter in other parts of our lives as well.

And that has prompted me to think about how the spiritual, psychological, and physical are all interconnected. My family and I had collected 30 cubic yards of extraneous stuff throughout the years. It took a lot of hard work, a few uncertain moments, and several friends, to help us clean up. I’ve noticed that the physical realm isn’t the only place where that is true. For me, seminary was a time to do the hard work of clearing out spiritual things that I didn’t really need anymore (with the help and support of friends and family) so that I could create the space needed for a renewed and strengthened relationship with God. And several years ago I read a book on organization for executives that suggested keeping physical notes as a way of clearing your mind to allow for more creative thinking.

With fall bearing down on us, I suppose it is a little late in the calendar year to suggest some spring cleaning. But there is no time like the present to gather some friends and family, and start doing that hard work of clearing the clutter out of our lives. I think you’ll be surprised by how far a little cleaning can go toward improving your outlook. And, in the process, you get the chance to build and strengthen your relationships with others, and even with God. And I can’t think of a better way to store up some treasure where it’s safe from moths, rust, and burglers.

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